KFPS Royal Friesian
Performance tests and explanation of evaluation criteria

 

IBOP riding test & Central Examination

1.  A – X - C        Enter at working trot, C   Follow left track

2.  A   Large circle

3. H – X – F  Change hands, and at X transition to medium walk

4. C   Come to a halt, then go forward at medium walk

5. Between K and E Working trot

6. B   Large circle

7. K – X – M  Change hands at medium trot

8.  A   Turn away
     X   Transition to medium walk
     C   Right hand

9.  Between M and B Working trot

10. A   Serpentine with 3 turns

11. Between C and M medium walk

12. M – X – K   Change hands, letting the horse stretch its neck,  then adjust reins 

13.  Between A and F Working trot

14.  B   Turn away,   E   Left hand

15. Between A and F Working canter left

16. B   Large circle, including a few bounds at medium canter

17. Between C and H Working trot

18. F – X – H  Change hands at medium trot, then working trot

19. E   Turn away
B   Right hand

20. Between A and K Working canter right

21. E   Large circle, including a few bounds at medium canter

22. Between C and M Working trot

23. B   Large circle, letting the horse stretch its neck, then adjust reins

24. A   Turn away,   X   Come to a halt, pay respects to the jury, then go forward at free walk,  C   Follow right track, and leave the ring at A

 

IBOP driving test

1. A-F-B-M-C Enter working trot track left
2. E-B-E full circle
3. F-X-H change rein with some strides medium trot

4. C 3-loop serpentine width of the arena

5. between H & M  medium walk

6. B track right

7. between B & E halt 3 to 5 seconds
    proceed in medium walk
    E track left

8. between K & A  working trot

9. B-E-B full circle twice around letting the horse stretch forward and downward
    between B & M shorten the reins

10. between M-C-H develop working canter
       E-B-E full circle

11. between K-A-F working trot

12. F-E change rein

13. E-B-E full circle

14. between H-C-M develop working canter
       B-E-B full circle

15. between F-A-K working trot

16. K-X-M change rein in medium trot

17. between H-E medium walk
       K-A-F let the horse stretch forward and downward

18. F-X-G turn to the center and
     between F-X shorten the rains and 
     between X-G halt and salute

Leave arena in free walk

 

IBOP basic show driving test

1.  A - C   Enter at working trot C  Right hand

2.  K-E   Between K and E transition to medium walk

3.  E   Turn away

4.  B   Left hand

5.  B-M  Between B and M trot on

6.  E   Large circle

7.  F-M   Trot with more action

8.  H   Change hands

9.   K-H   Trot with more action

10.  B   Large circle

11.  E   Large circle, letting the horse stretch its neck Between E and H adjust reins

12.  M   Change hands, and between M and X transition to walk

13.  A   Turn away, and at X, come to a halt


 

IBOP show driving test

1.  Enter at a trot on the right hand.
2. On a long side of the ring, turn away and come to a halt on line A-C. Inspection will follow.
3. Drive away at a trot on the right hand.
4. Twice around the ring, change hands during a diagonal, and then twice around on the left hand.
5. On a long side of the ring, turn away and come line up at A-C.
At A, leave the ring at a trot .

 

EVALUATION HEADINGS

IBOP / ABFP / CO RIDING TEST

Walk Trot Canter Carriage & balance Agility Transitions Impulsion Total
2x 2x 2x 2x 1x 1x 1x  
 
Walk            Trot            Canter            Carriage                & balance Agility          Transitions Impulsion Total            
2x 2x 2x 2x 1x 1x 1x  

 

IBOP DRIVING TEST

Walk Trot Canter Carriage & balance Agility Transitions Impulsion Total
2x 2x 2x 2x 1x 1x 1x  


ABFP / CO DRIVING TEST

Walk            

 Trot             

Carriage         & balance Agility   Transitions    Impulsion  Total    
2x 2x 2x 2x 1x 2x    

IBOP / CO SHOW DRIVING TEST
 

Walk Trot Trot Trot Carriage & balance Front Aglility Impulsion Total      
  Use of forelegs Use of hind legs Moment of sus-pension          
1x 2x 2x 1x 2x 1x 1x 1x  


Horses taking the ABFP test receive a separate score for potential as a show driving horse.

  

EXPLANATION OF EVALUATION CRITERIA

Walk

The walk is a marching gait in which the footfalls of the horse’s feet follow one another in “four time”. The four legs are lifted alternately and separately as in the example beginning with the left hind leg: left hind, left front, right hind, right front, etc. The hind foot is placed in the same spot on the ground that has just been vacated by the front foot. The walk movement must flow throughout the horse’s body. For a brief moment during the walk, the legs on the same lateral side form a distinct V shape.
The IBOP tests require only the medium walk. At the medium walk, the horse moves forward in a spirited, uninhibited manner displaying an active yet calm appearance. The walk is regular and firm. The rider leads the horse by in a constant slight moving through.
Characteristics: even cadence, agility, long strides, activity, relaxed appearance, spring.

 

Trot (riding and driving tests)
The trot is a gait of “two time” on alternate diagonal legs (left front with right hind and right front with left hind) separated by a moment of suspension. Example: left front with right hind, moment of suspension, right front with left hind, moment of suspension, left front with right hind, etc. At the trot, the placement of the legs is always free, active and regular. The IBOP riding and driving tests require the working and medium trots. The trot required in the show driving test is described separately.
The working trot is a gait between the collected and medium trots. The horse should display good balance, hold its neck arched upwards, and move forward in uniform springy steps with active hind quarters. Active hind quarters does not mean that the horse is ridden towards or in collection but that it is ridden with enough impulsion that the hind quarters should be full of driving effort.   
The medium trot is a gait between the working and extended trots. At the medium trot, the horse moves forward freely and visibly extends its strides at an equal rate accompanied by a corresponding extension in the upper line. This extension originates from a clear impulsion with driving force from the hind quarters. The rider allows the horse to extend its neck so that the nose is pointed forwards rather than straight down as it is in the working trot. The strides remain regular and movement is balanced and relaxed. The horse covers more ground with its extended strides but the speed at which it places its feet on the ground does not increase.
Characteristics: even cadence, agility, stateliness, spring, balance, carriage, impulsion, moment of suspension, long strides, activity, relaxed appearance, use of forelegs.

 

Canter (riding en driving test IBOP)
The canter is a “three time” gait, the legs being placed in a canter on the left lead as follows: right hind, diagonal right front with left hind, left front, moment of suspension, right hind, etc. The canter should be light and cadenced with a regular stride. Breaking into a canter should always appear resolute. The IBOP requires only the working and medium canters (with a few flying changes).
The working canter is a gait between the collected and medium canters. In this version of the canter, the horse should display good balance, hold its neck arched upwards, and move forward in equal, light, cadenced bounds. The hind quarters are active and with sufficient impulsion to provide a full driving effort.
The medium canter is a gait between the working and the extended canters. The horse moves forward freely and visible extends its bounds with moderate extension and corresponding extension of the upper line. This extension originates from a clear impulsion with driving force from the hind quarters. The canter remains a clearly three-time gait. The rider allows the horse to extend its neck somewhat from the more arched position so that the nose is pointed forwards rather than straight down as it is in the working canter.
Characteristics: even cadence, agility, balance, impulsion, carriage, spring.

 

Carriage and balance
The proper carriage during the trot involves the drop of the hind quarters and the rise of the forequarters. The horse relaxes in the upper line and retains its straightness. The total picture is one of a clear slant upwards in the direction of the forequarters.
Characteristics: withers higher than the croup due to the drop in the hind quarters and the rise in the forequarters, relaxation in the upper line.

In ‘balance’, what is important is the proper equilibrium situation in which the horse moves during all the gaits. The horse should move rhythmically, calmly and with regularity, including the times when it lengthens its stride. When coming to a halt, a horse that is in balance places more of its weight on its hind quarters during transition and moves through as it stands still and faces straight ahead. When the horse extends its neck, it should maintain its pace, cadence, regularity and the use of its back so that the horse can extend its neck in a relaxed and balanced manner while retaining a slight moving through and impulsion.

 

Agility 
A horse’s agility is its ability to turn, stretch and bend its body without resulting in any stiffness or blockages in the spinal column or the joints. Agility is largely made possible by the suppleness and flexibility of the muscles. Agility allows a horse to tighten, extend and move its spinal column sideward without undesirable tension or resistance while completely retaining its rhythm of movement.

The horse moves while retaining its cadence and balance while its body accurately follows the line of the figures and turnings. In following these lines, the entire length of the horse’s body curves in the same direction. The horse must display a willingness to be guided from left to right.
The curvature in the horse’s body is seen only in the neck and loins but not in the rib and croup areas.

When the horse has its head in the right position when being ridden, its neck and trunk remain in a straight line and the horse will bend its head slightly to the left or right when given the proper aids. The rider sees one eye and the edge of one nostril of the horse.


Transitions
Transitions and changes of tempo are the basis of the equestrian art. In the transition, the horse remains relaxed, retains the cadence of the gait until the moment of transition, moves through properly and faces straight ahead. Transitions and changes of tempo must be clearly observable. From a transition from a working gait to a medium gait, the neck of the horse should point somewhat farther forward, thus making it possible to lengthen its strides. This allows the horse to remain relaxed, to retain its rhythm and to clearly extend its strides (at the trot) or its bounds (at the canter). The difference between a working gait and a medium gait (and back again) should be clearly observable.

 

Impulsion
In competitive show driving, this is called ‘willingness’. 
The horse’s urge to go forward, but always controlled and limited by the rider. The rider has control over the forward impulse and determines to what extent this urge results in the horse’s forward movement, i.e., the tempo. The energy generated from the hind quarters is controlled by the rider and is the basis the horse obliging the commands of the rider and working through.
Characteristics: forward energy generated from the hind quarters and lets the horse be transformed by the rider into a forward direction with an upward slant to the upper line and an appearance of being a closed solid unit.

 

Trot (show driving test)
The trot is a gait of “two time” on alternate diagonal legs (left front with right hind and right front with left hind) separated by a moment of suspension. Example: left front with right hind, moment of suspension, right front with left hind, moment of suspension, left front with right hind, etc. At the trot, the placement of the legs is always free, active and regular. The IBOP riding and driving tests require the working trot and medium trot.  
In the IBOP show driving test, the trot is characterized, in comparison with the trot in the riding and driving tests, by a longer moment of suspension, well-extended forelegs, high stepping forelegs, and powerful hind legs in which the hind feet are placed farther beneath the body. This latter characteristic makes the forehand lighter so that it rises. The trot is accompanied by a proud bearing. 
Characteristics: as compared to the riding and driving tests more and higher front and hind leg action, longer moment of suspension, definitely rising from hind quarters to forehand.

 

Use of hind legs of show driving horse
This is the extent to which the horse brings its cannon to a horizontal position and the extent to which the horse picks up its hind legs from the ground (power) and places them forward. The hind legs cover a lot of ground between lifting them and placing them on the ground and the rear hoof is placed far in front of the impression left by the front hoof. Both the hock and ankle display considerable flexion. The hind legs are placed far under the body.
Characteristics: power, flexion in hock and ankle, stateliness, strength.

 

Use of forelegs of show driving horse
This is the extent to which a substantial flexion in the knee brings the forearm of the foreleg at least to a horizontal position and the degree to which the foreleg is stretched forward. 
Characteristics: forearm reaches at least a horizontal position and, once the forearm has reached its highest position, it should not simply drop but extend as far forward as possible.

 

Moment of suspension of show driving horse
This is the length of time at which the horse is changing between the two diagonal pairs of legs and when the horse is not making any contact with the ground. The moment of suspension is the extent of movement resulting from the delay and elasticity of lifting the hind legs and not by the speed of doing so.
Characteristics: powerfully lifted hind legs, feet lifted high off the ground and covering a lot of ground. 

 

Front of show driving horse
At the trot, the horse uses its head and neck to achieve a proud bearing in which the neck is almost vertical as opposed to the body but tightly arched so that the nasal bone is held perpendicular to the ground. 
Characteristics: shape and length of the neck, angle of head and neck, placement of the head.

 Version 2013, June